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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Hotlines and Helplines

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 7:54 pm

Hotlines and Helplines



Child Abuse Reporting Numbers Listed by State

State toll-free numbers for specific agencies designated to receive and investigate reports of suspected child abuse and neglect.
http://www.childwelfare.gov/pubs/reslist/rl_dsp.cfm?rs_id=5&rate_chno=11-11172


Child Pornography Tipline

1-800-843-5678
http://www.missingkids.com/missingkids/servlet/PageServlet?LanguageCountry=en_US&PageId=2936


ChildhelpUSA

Report Child Abuse

1-800-4-A-Child

1-800-422-4453
http://www.missingkids.com/missingkids/servlet/PageServlet?LanguageCountry=en_US&PageId=2936


Cybertip

Canada's National Tipline for Reporting Online Sexual Exploitation of Children

1-866-658-9022
https://www.cybertip.ca/en/cybertip/report_form/


Dating Violence & Stalking Resource Center

Monday-Friday
8:30 am - 8:30 pm ET
Serving victims in more than 180 languages

1-800-FYI-CALL

1-800-394-2255
http://www.ncvc.org/ncvc/main.aspx?dbID=DB_DatingViolenceResourceCenter101


National Domestic Violence/Abuse Hotline

1-800-799-SAFE
1-800-799-7233
1-800-787-3224 TDD

http://www.ndvh.org/

National Hotlines and Helplines
http://www.focusas.com/Hotlines.html


National Teen Dating Abuse Helpline

1-866-331-9474

http://www.loveisrespect.org/

Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network (RAINN)

1-800-656-HOPE

1-800-656-4673
http://www.rainn.org/


STOP IT NOW! Helpline

If a youth is sexually abusing

Monday-Friday 9 am - 6 pm, ET

1-888-PREVENT

1-888-773-8368
http://stopitnow.com/


Survivors UK Helpline

For men who have been raped or sexually abused

Monday, Tuesday, Thursday 7-10pm UK time

0845 122 1201

http://www.survivorsuk.org/

International Hotlines

https://www.inhope.org/en/content/details.php



American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children ~ Helps professionals to respond to children and their families affected by abuse and violence.
http://www.apsac.org/



Association for the Treatment of Sexual Abusers ~ This professional organization focuses on the prevention of sexual abuse through effective management of sex offenders.
http://www.atsa.com/index.html


Bishop Accountability ~ Information and resources documenting the sexual abuse crisis in the Catholic Church.
http://www.bishop-accountability.org/


Captive Daughters ~ Anti-trafficking group that focuses on ending the sexual bondage of female adolescents and children.
http://www.captivedaughters.org/


Child Abuse Prevention Network ~ For professionals in the field of child abuse and neglect.
http://www.child-abuse.com/


Child Welfare Information Gateway ~ National resource on the prevention, identification, and treatment of child abuse and neglect and related child welfare issues.
http://www.childwelfare.gov/


Child Welfare League ~ Association of more than 1,100 public and private nonprofit agencies that assist over 3.5 million abused and neglected children and their families each year with a wide range of services.
http://www.cwla.org/


Crimes Against Children Research Center ~ Provides research and statistics about the nature of crimes including child abduction, homicide, rape, assault, and physical and sexual abuse as well as their impact.
http://www.unh.edu/ccrc/


Empathic Parenting ~ Website of the Canadian Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children.
http://www.empathicparenting.org/



Johnny Gosch Foundation ~ Educates on the reality and seriousness of kidnapping and pornography, and how it could happen to your family. READ THIS IMPORTANT BOOK! Why Johnny Can't Come Home.
http://www.johnnygosch.com/


Joyful Child Foundation ~ In memory of Samantha Runnion, The Joyful Child is dedicated to protecting our nation's children from sexual abuse and abduction through programs that unite and uplift communities.
http://thejoyfulchild.org/


Justice for Children ~ The mission is to raise the consciousness of our society about the failure of our governmental agencies to protect victims of child abuse, to provide legal advocacy for abused children and to develop and implement a full range of solutions that enhance the quality of life for these children.
http://www.jfcadvocacy.org/


Morality in Media ~ Interfaith organization that combats obscenity and upholds decency standards in the media. It maintains the National Obscenity Law Center, a clearinghouse of legal materials on obscenity law, and conducts public information programs to educate and involve concerned citizens.
http://www.moralityinmedia.org/


Mothers Against Sexual Abuse (MASA) ~ Education, advocacy, and support.
http://www.againstsexualabuse.org/


National Association to Protect Children ~ Powerful, nonpartisan grassroots force for the protection of children from abuse, exploitation and neglect.
http://www.protect.org/


National Center for Children Exposed to Violence ~ Resource center for anyone seeking information about the effects of violence on children and the initiatives designed to address this problem.
http://www.nccev.org/


National Center for Victims of Crime ~ Victim services, advocacy, and education.
http://www.ncvc.org/


National Coalition Against Domestic Violence ~ Advocacy, education, and support for community-based groups to eliminate both personal and societal violence against all women and children.
http://www.ncadv.org/


National Organization Against Male Sexual Victimization ~ Education, advocacy, and support for adult male survivors of childhood sexual abuse.
http://www.malesurvivor.org/


National Organization for Victim Assistance ~ Promotes rights and services for victims of crime and crisis everywhere.
http://www.trynova.org/


Obscenitycrimes.org ~ Resource for educating the public and reporting possible violations of Internet obscenity laws.
http://www.trynova.org/


Operation Blue Ridge Thunder ~ Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force.
http://www.blueridgethunder.com/


Parents for Megan's Law ~ Provides assistance to parents and organizations about ways to effectively and responsibly manage Megan’s Law high risk sex offender notifications on a community level, help raise awareness about the public’s rights for information under Megan’s Law, and ways to prevent childhood sexual abuse.
http://www.parentsformeganslaw.org/


Prevent Child Abuse America ~ Working at the national, state and local levels to prevent the abuse and neglect of our nation's children.
http://www.preventchildabuse.org/index.shtml


Prostitution Research and Education ~ A sponsored project of San Francisco Women's Centers, this site includes list of organizations providing services for women and children escaping prostitution.
http://www.prostitutionresearch.com/


SASIAN ~ Sibling Abuse Survivors' Information and Advocacy Network
http://www.sasian.org/index.htm


Speak Out for Stephanie ~ Provides information and creates public awareness about all sex offenders, victim's rights, and the quandary within the criminal justice system. SOS Chapters on college campuses.
http://www.sos.lawrence.com/index.html


Stop Educator Sexual Abuse, Misconduct, and Exploitation ~ SESAME believes the power imbalance between a teacher and a student of any age creates a climate that can facilitate sexually exploitative behavior by the teacher, behavior that is psychologically equivalent to incest.
http://www.sesamenet.org/


YES International Child Abuse Network ~ Provides crisis, information and referral services world-wide for those who are having issues around child abuse.
http://www.yesican.org/

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Support Networks

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 7:56 pm

Support Networks



Broken Spirits Network ~ Online community and support group that focuses on aiding both current and past victims of child abuse, sexual abuse, and domestic violence. Provides a comprehensive list of shelters, hotlines and organizations that can provide help for potential victims.
http://www.brokenspirits.com/


Christian Recovery International ~ A coalition of ministries dedicated to helping the Christian community become a safe and helpful place for people recovering from addiction, abuse or trauma.
http://www.christianrecovery.com/


Co-Dependents Anonymous ~ A fellowship of men and women whose common purpose is to develop healthy relationships through the 12 Steps and 12 Traditions.
http://www.coda.org/


Co-Dependents of Sex Addicts (COSA) ~ 12-step support for friends and family members whose lives have been affected by another person's compulsive sexual behavior.
http://www.cosa-recovery.org/


Divided Heart ~ Online Christian community dedicated to overcoming self-destructive and inappropriate behaviors and healing from them whether you are struggling yourself or you are close to someone who is.
http://www.dividedheart.com/


Making Daughters Safe Again ~ Online support forum and advocacy for survivors of mother-daughter sexual abuse.
http://mdsa-online.org/


Parents Anonymous ~ Encourages all parents to ask for help early, whatever their circumstances, to effectively break the cycle of abuse to protect today's children and strengthen tomorrow's generation of parents.
http://www.parentsanonymous.org/


SNAP (Survivors Network of Those Abused by Priests) ~ The nation's largest, oldest and most active support group for women and men wounded by religious authority figures (priests, ministers, bishops, deacons, nuns, and others).
http://www.snapnetwork.org/


Survivors of Incest Anonymous ~ 12-step self-group of adults who were victims of child sexual abuse.
http://www.siawso.org/


Survivors of Spiritual Abuse ~ Resource and e-mail support list for anyone who has been abused in any way in the name of a religion or spiritual belief.
http://www.sosa.org/


Survivorship ~ For survivors of ritualistic abuse, mind control and torture, and their allies.
http://www.survivorship.org/


YES I Can Break the Cycle ~ Facilitated support chat rooms for survivors of abuse
http://www.yesican.org/chat.html

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Domestic Violence

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 7:59 pm

Press Room
Each time a domestic violence story is covered, media has an opportunity to save lives.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline is a leading resource utilized by media, to provide viewers, listeners and readers with a toll-free number to call from anywhere in the country to access safety from their abusive relationships.

More than just a bridge to safety, the National Domestic Violence Hotline is available to callers 24 hours a day, 365 days a year to provide services in more than 170 languages. Hotline advocates answer questions, provide safety planning and information as well as directly connect callers to domestic violence resources available in their local calling area. All calls to the Hotline are confidential and anonymous.

Media Contacts
Retha Fielding
512.794.1133

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty National Missing Unidentified Persons

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:01 pm


http://www.namus.gov/

The National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, NamUs, is the first national online repository for missing persons records and unidentified
decedent cases. It was launched in July 2007 by the Office of Justice Program’s National Institute of Justice.
NamUs is made up of two databases: (1) records of unidentified decedents (select "Unidentified Decedents”) and (2) missing persons reports (select “Missing Persons”).
Currently, the unidentified decedents database is searchable and available for medical examiners and coroners to upload their cases. The search capability of the missing persons database is in development; the site currently provides resources on State clearinghouses, medical examiners and coroners, law enforcement, victim assistance resources, and legislation.
In 2009, the two databases will be linked. Families, law enforcement agencies, medical examiners and coroners, victim advocates, and the general public will be able to search for matches between missing persons and unidentified decedent records.

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty National Center For Missing Adults

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:02 pm

National Centre For Missing Adults
http://www.theyaremissed.org/ncma/index.php
National Clearinghouse
The National Center for Missing Adults (NCMA) serves as a national repository of information accessible to the general public, advocacy groups, and law enforcement, medical examiners and coroners.

The National Center for Missing Adults (NCMA) is a division of Nation's Missing Children Organization, Inc. (NMCO) - a 501c (3) non-profit organization working in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs.
The National Center for Missing Adults (NCMA) was formally established after the passage of Kristen’s Law (H.R. 2780) by the 106th United States Congress on October 26th, 2000 (S11181). As directed by H.R. 2780, NCMA operates as the national clearinghouse for missing adults, providing services and coordination between various government agencies, law enforcement, media, and most importantly - the families of missing adults. NCMA also maintains a national database of missing adults determined to be "endangered" or otherwise at-risk.
More precisely - NCMA performs the following core legally mandated functions:
(1) to establish and maintain a national clearinghouse for missing adults;
(2) to assist law enforcement and families in locating missing adults;
(3) to serve as a national repository of information accessible to the general public, advocacy groups, and law enforcement for the purpose of tracking missing adults who are determined by law enforcement to be endangered due to age, diminished mental capacity, or the circumstances of disappearance are suspicious, when foul play is suspected or circumstances are unknown;
(4) to maintain statistical information of adults reported as missing;
(5) to provide informational resources and referrals to families of missing adults;
(6) to assist in public notification and provide victim advocacy related to missing adults;
(7) to develop and deliver training to improve law enforcement response to missing adults and their families through training and promotion of best practices in service delivery.

The National Center for Missing Adults (NCMA) is a division of Nation's Missing Children Organization, Inc. (NMCO) - a 501c (3) non-profit organization working in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Justice’s Bureau of Justice Assistance, Office of Justice Programs.
The National Center for Missing Adults (NCMA) was formally established after the passage of Kristen’s Law (H.R. 2780) by the 106th United States Congress on October 26th, 2000 (S11181). As directed by H.R. 2780, NCMA operates as the national clearinghouse for missing adults, providing services and coordination between various government agencies, law enforcement, media, and most importantly - the families of missing adults. NCMA also maintains a national database of missing adults determined to be "endangered" or otherwise at-risk.
More precisely - NCMA performs the following core legally mandated functions:
(1) to establish and maintain a national clearinghouse for missing adults;
(2) to assist law enforcement and families in locating missing adults;
(3) to serve as a national repository of information accessible to the general public, advocacy groups, and law enforcement for the purpose of tracking missing adults who are determined by law enforcement to be endangered due to age, diminished mental capacity, or the circumstances of disappearance are suspicious, when foul play is suspected or circumstances are unknown;
(4) to maintain statistical information of adults reported as missing;
(5) to provide informational resources and referrals to families of missing adults;
(6) to assist in public notification and provide victim advocacy related to missing adults;
(7) to develop and deliver training to improve law enforcement response to missing adults and their families through training and promotion of best practices in service delivery.


Last edited by avalonpointe on Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:07 pm; edited 1 time in total

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty America's Most Wanted

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:03 pm


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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Myths and Facts about Rape:

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:04 pm

Myths and Facts about rape:


1.You are safe at work.
Fact: Over 13,000 women are raped on the job each year in the United States
2. Rape doesn't happen very often.
Fact: Every 6 minutes another person is raped in the United States.


3. Rape is just "no big deal".
Fact: Rape has a devastating effect on it's victims.
Nearly one-third of all rape victims will have rape-related PTSD.


4.Real rapes are only committed by strangers.
Fact: As many as 4/5 of the victims will know their attacker.


5.Women who are raped are just asking for trouble.
Fact: No one, ever, deserves to be raped. Victims cannot suffer the blame for the actions
another person uses against them.

6. Unless a weapon is used it isn't rape.
Fact: Anytime someone uses force with intercourse it is rape. The force may include weapons,
intimidation, drugs, alcohol, or a victim's own diminished mental capacity.

7. If he bought dinner she "owes" him sex.
Fact: No one "owes" sex for anything.

8. If a woman doesn't fight against her attack it isn't really rape.
Fact: Any sex act forced against another person is rape. It doesn't matter if the victim was able to
fight back or not.

9. If the victim isn't a virgin then it wasn't really rape.
Fact: Even if the victim is not a virgin and forced to have sex against that person's
wishes then it is rape.

10. Husbands can't rape their wives. It's her duty.
Fact: As many as 14% of women who have been married have also been victims of rape by their husbands.


11. Women cry rape because they had sex and changed their minds.
Fact: Rape is the most underreported crime in the country. Only 16% are ever reported to the police.

12. If it is really rape then the victim will report it immediately.
Fact: Responses collected from the National Women's Study show 84% of rape victims never reported the crime at all.


13. She really wanted to have sex so it was ok to get rough.
Fact: We all have the right to say no, to change our minds, or decide not to have sex.
It doesn't matter what activity proceeded the "no".

14. Rape only happens to women.
Fact: Men, and children are also victims of rape.


15. Rape only happens to women who are on the streets late at night.
Fact: Rape happens everywhere. It happens on the job, in our homes, in parking lots and at school.

16. I don't know anyone who's ever been raped.
Fact: Rape victims are doctors, teachers, nurses, pastor's wives, checkout clerks,
accountants, engineers or anyone. Most people know someone who has been raped.
You may just not know who it is.

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty AARDVARC

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:05 pm

AARDVARC is An Abuse, Rape and Domestic Violence Aid and Resource Collection.
http://www.aardvarc.org/

This site is for victims of violence, their families and friends, and the agencies and programs which serve them, both public and private. Issues addressed here currently include: domestic violence, stalking, and sexual assault. The child abuse and adult survivors of child sexual assault sections are currently being re-built and should be back online shortly.

The goal of this website is to assist efforts to aid and support those trying to remove themselves from abusive situations and build healthier, stronger lives. For individuals, we hope to provide general educational and reference material as well as a comprehensive nationwide directory of services for "one stop shopping".

For agencies, programs, and other service providers, we hope to provide a bank of information and resources to help cut costs, increase effectiveness, train staff and volunteers, seek funding, build or improve a website, and network with peers for maximum problem-solving impact.

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty National Center for Victims of Crime

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:06 pm

The National Center for Victims of Crime works to make sure all crime victims get the assistance and information they need. We are committed to doing our best to help you.

Our GetHelp bulletins provide information on a wide range of topics, including the impact of crime, victims' rights, and the criminal and civil justice processes. The bulletins also include resources for victims, their families, and friends.

Contact us for help, information about your options, and referrals to local services anywhere in the country. You can:

• call us Monday - Friday, 8:30 am - 8:30 pm ET at
1-800-FYI-CALL (1-800-394-2255) or our TTY line, 1-800-211-7996

• e-mail us (Due to the large volume of e-mails we receive, we recommend calling our toll-free Helpline for immediate assistance Monday-Friday from 8:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m., ET, at 1-800-FYI-CALL) or

• write us at: Victim Services
National Center for Victims of Crime
2000 M Street, NW
Suite 480
Washington, DC 20036

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Violence Against Women

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:08 pm

http://www.ncvc.org/ncvc/main.aspx?dbID=DB_ViolenceAgainstWomen155

Violence Against Women


The National Center for Victims of Crime is dedicated to helping women who have been victimized by crime--and those who support them --find the resources needed to rebuild lives.




Get Help Series

Domestic Violence Stalking
Domestic Violence: Safety Planning for Victims Stalking Incident and Behavior Log
Stalking Incident and Behavior Log Stalking and the Law
Rape-related PTSD Stalking Questions & Answers
Sexual Assault Sexual Assault Legislation
Dating Violence More help for teens


More Resources

Help for Victims
Contact us either by email or by calling our Helpline, 1-800-FYI-CALL. We'll connect you with helpful services in your area from our database of more than 8,000 victim service providers nationwide.

Special Collection on Violence Against Women
Comprised of a more than 1,000 resources from our Web site. Plus search thousands of additional VAW resources on the Web.

Resource Library
Full-text publications, current statistics with references, and a list of recommended readings. More Helpful Links for victims.

Public Policy
The National Center for Victims of Crime works to advance laws and policies that create resources and secure rights and protections for victims of crime at the state and federal levels.

Civil Justice Database
Learn more about the civil justice system and how it can help crime victims rebuild their lives, via the 11,000 case studies available in our fully searchable database .

Stalking Information Clearinghouse
A searchable database of more than 400 resources including research on stalking, practitioner-specific educational tools, multidisciplinary curricula, model protocols, and more.
Annual Observances

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Florida Supreme Court Homepage:

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:09 pm

The Florida Supreme Court homepage is:
http://www.floridasupremecourt.org

The Florida State Courts homepage is:
http://www.flcourts.org

For Family Law Forms and a list of local Family Law Self-help Centers,
please visit http://www.flcourts.org.

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Registered Charity?

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:12 pm

Check out whether a charity is registered in Florida by calling our toll-free hotline at 1-800-HELP-FLA (1-800-435-7352).”

Email addy : www.800helpfla.com

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Safehouses:

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:13 pm

http://www.phs2.net/cwi/L3/o1145i.htm

Anderson House - A halfway house for women recovering from alcohol and drug dependency.
Back Hills Guest House for Women, The - Victoria, B.C.
Claire House - Residential program for women and their children , utilizing individual, group and family counseling, as well as exercise, recreational activity, 12-step self-help groups and a structured, disciplined environment. The women and children will receive state-of-the-art care to restructure their lives and live successfully, drug free.
Dorcas House - Tampa Florida based ministry that gives shelter on a temporary basis to women and women with children who have no place to stay because of spousal abuse, women released from jail without a permanent place to stay, and women in transit who are victims of crime and temporarily without money for food and shelter.
Epiphany House - Long Branch, NJ
Hecate House - Newseeland
House of Hope - Santa Ana, CA
Laura's House - Abused women and their children need Laura's House. Committed to ending violence against women. We provide the abused woman and their children with a safe, violent-free shelter, counseling, advocacy, resources and a 24-hour hotline.
Mrs. Wilson's Halfway House for Women - A 14-bed, 12-step, halfway house for recovering women located in Morristown, New Jersey. It is named after the wife of AA's co-founder, Bill Wilson.
Quigley House - Offers safe emergency shelter and support services for women and their children in Clay County Florida and the surrounding areas. The only shelter for battered women and children in Clay County Florida.
Sophia Snow House - A retirement center for women, it is home to 24 elderly women who are enjoying the security, companionship, and convenience of a small-scale assisted living arrangement.

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Shelter for Abused Women & Children

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:15 pm

http://www.naplesshelter.org/english/abuse.htm

Shelter for Abused Women & Children
If You Are Abused
24 Hour Crisis Line (239) 775-1101

Actions you may want to consider | In an emergency | Prepare an escape bag
Should you decide to leave your relationship | You may ask an advocate about
Protect yourself at home | Protect yourself outside your home | Be safe at work
Your safety and that of your children and pets need to be your top concern. Leaving an abusive relationship can be dangerous. Abusers are not predictable. Safety planning is complex. Our trained staff can help you.

If you are a victim of domestic violence, it is not your fault. The abuser is responsible. The Shelter staff will listen and support your decisions. There are steps you can take to help end the abuse.

Some actions you may want to consider:
Call the police in an emergency or file a report about the violence.
Call our domestic violence hotline (239) 775-1101 to talk, get information or ideas, find a shelter, or make a safety or escape plan.
Have the abuser ordered by the court to stay away from you by getting an Injunction for Protection.
See a doctor for injuries and ask him/her to write down what caused the injuries.
Talk to a friend, family member, neighbor, clergy, or someone else for support; and ask for help.
Keep a journal in words and photographs.
In an emergency:
If you are at home and are being threatened or attacked, stay away from the kitchen (the abuser can find weapons like knives).
Stay away from bathrooms, closets, or small spaces where the abuser can trap you. Get to a room with an outside door or window to escape.
Get to a room with a telephone to call for help. Lock the abuser outside if you can.
Call 911 right away for help.
If possible, run to a friend's or neighbor's house for help. Take the children with you.
If a police officer comes, tell him/her what happened; and get his/her name and badge number.
Take pictures of bruises and injuries.
Prepare an escape bag:
Prepare a bag, box, or suitcase filled with things you will need if you leave. Keep it in a safe place away from home, if possible. The escape bag is a secret from the abuser or anyone who could tell him you are planning to leave. Place "originals" in the bag except for the items you must have with you or things you can't take without the abuser noticing. Avoid using your purse or car.
Identification (driver's license, passports, green cards, work permits)
Birth certificates for yourself and your children
Social Security cards for yourself and your children
Extra car, house, storage, business, or other keys
Checkbook, ATM card
Credit cards, bank books, etc.
Address book and telephone numbers
Food stamps, Medicaid cards, etc.
Car registration
Car, health, and life insurance papers
School and medical records
Divorce, custody, or injunction papers
Proof of income for partner (check stub)
Home calling card (calls can be traced)
Copies of bills you owe with your partner
Change of clothes
Medicine and prescriptions (extra)
Personal hygiene products (tampons, toothbrushes, deodorant, etc.)
Diapers, formula, toys, blankets
Pictures, jewelry, keepsakes
Abuser's personal information (date of birth, Social Security number, work permit information, place of employment, description of vehicle and license number)
Picture of family which includes abuser
Lease or titles of property
Should you decide to leave your relationship:
Leaving can be very dangerous and should be planned carefully. To speak to a counselor who can help you develop a safe plan to leave, call (239) 775-1101 at any time.

You may ask an advocate about:
What resources are available to you in our community
Help filing your immigration status
How to file for a free injunction for protection
Understanding the judicial process
Support groups and individual counseling
Relocating
Staying at a free emergency domestic abuse shelter or other safe place
Address confidentiality
Social Security number changes
Victim’s compensation
Protect yourself at home:
Learn where to get help. Memorize emergency phone numbers.
Keep a phone in a room you can lock from the inside. If you can, get a cellular phone that you keep with you at all times. Keep it charged, and know blackout areas where the phone will not work.
If the abuser has moved out, change the locks on your doors, and install locks on your windows.
Plan an escape route out of your home, and teach it to your children.
Think about where you would go if you need to escape.
Ask your neighbors to call the police if they see the abuser at your house. Make a signal for them to call the police, for example, if the phone rings twice, a shade is pulled down, or a certain light is on.
Get an unlisted phone number.
Block caller ID (call your phone company for information).
Use an answering machine to screen your calls.
Take a good self-defense course. Carry a noisemaker or personal alarm.
Protect yourself outside your home:
Change regular travel habits, such as riding with others and using different routes.
Shop and bank in different places, particularly away from the abuser.
Cancel any bank accounts or credit cards you shared. Open new accounts at a different bank in your name only.
Keep your court order and emergency numbers with you at all times.
Keep a cell phone with you and program it to speed dial 911 (or other emergency numbers).
If you have to travel to another state for work or to get away from the abuser, take your Injunction for Protection with you. It is valid everywhere in the United States.
Carry noisemakers and/or pepper spray.
Be safe at work:
Ask someone to screen your calls.
Keep a copy of your court order at work.
Give or show a picture of the abuser to security guards and friends where you work.
Tell your supervisors about the abuse. Ask them to help make it harder for the abuser to find you. Have them consider opportunities for changes within the work structure.
Don't go to lunch alone.
Ask a security guard or co-worker to walk you to your car or bus.
If the abuser contacts you at work, save voice mail and e-mail messages.
Locate a well-lighted parking space close to the door.
For information on the relationship between animal cruelty and domestic violence, including how to protect your pets, please visit The Humane Society of the United States website. This link is provided for informational purposes only, the Shelter is not affiliated with The Humane Society of the United States; linking does not imply endorsement of programs or services by either party.

The Shelter's vision is a community without domestic violence so that every home is a safe haven for the family it shelters.
The Shelter's mission is to help adult and child victims and survivors of domestic violence through safety, intervention, and support; to educate the public about domestic violence; and to advocate for social change against domestic violence.
“Breaking the cycle of abuse, building hope...”
Shelter for Abused Women & Children
P.O. Box 10102
Naples, Florida 34101 Questions? Call 239-775-3862
Immokalee Outreach Office: 239-657-5700
Email: Info@naplesshelter.org

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Safehouse:

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:15 pm

ABBA HOUSE-http://www.abbahouse.com/index.php?pageid=1

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty dreamcathersforabusedchildren

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:17 pm

Hello,
SOURCE:
http://www.countypress.com/stories/062809/loc_20090628090.shtml

PUBLISHED: Sunday, June 28, 2009
Early release of sex offenders from state prisons concerns victims, county law officials


By SUSAN YOUNGER
staff reporter

LAPEER -- As the State of Michigan closes prisons and slashes prison populations to save money, those charged with the safety of the community are concerned with the early release of sex offenders into Lapeer County.

Advertisement
"The Michigan Department of Corrections is releasing criminal sexual conduct offenders by the hundreds from prison," said Lapeer County Prosecuting Attorney Byron Konschuh Tuesday. "It is my understanding they dropped 10 off on the courthouse steps today. Genesee County is getting over 130 and this is happening throughout the state. They're being released in Lapeer County, even if they didn't necessarily reside here prior to the crime or committed the crime in Lapeer County."

Michigan officials are still trying to balance the state budget, which has a projected $2-billion shortfall for the fiscal year that begins Oct. 1.

More sex offenders are expected in the county, and the early releases are a recipe for disaster, Konschuh added.

"No one in the community knows this is happening," Konschuh said. "We don't know where they will be living. They're supposed to receive help to find jobs. With unemployment the way it is I'm concerned."

Adding to the problem, Konschuh and Director of Victim's Services Catherine Strong has no idea which offenders are receiving the early out dates and how many more will be in the county.

"It's my job to make sure they're not a victim again," Strong said. "I would hope to contact the victims, but I don't know which offenders are due for release. I was getting LEIN (law enforcement information network) sheets, but they're no longer forwarding them to us. Now I have to rely on the state doing their job of notifying the victim."

Strong and Konschuh recently helped two women file appeals in an attempt to keep the offenders behind bars. They had no idea the two were going to be released early; they were contacted by the victims.

A former Metamora woman, now 18, who was sexually abused when she was a juvenile by her stepfather, has left home. She is so frightened he will find her that she is hiding, said her mother Crystal Galloway.

"He was sentenced in 2002 to two counts of criminal sexual conduct to a person under 13," said Galloway, who has remarried. "He was sentenced to between seven and 30 years in prison. I got a letter Thursday saying he will be on the streets in September. He told people he was grooming my daughter to be his next wife. How can they let this happen to her?"

Another woman, who was raised in Lapeer County, left the state and has since remarried after her daughter was abused. Though she changed their names and left without a trace, her former husband found her while still in prison.

"He abused my daughter for almost eight years beginning when she was just over two years old," said the woman, who doesn't want her name used. "I am devastated. When you're a sex offender there is no cure."

Though he was supposed to be incarcerated for up to seven more years, the man could be on the streets in September.

"I haven't told my daughter yet," she said. "We don't want contact with him, and I don't want him around my children. I would not want to take the chance."

Konschuh and Strong will file applications for leave of appeal on behalf of any CSC victims to deter early release of sex offenders. Phone (810) 667-0326 if notified of a release.

Susan Younger may be reached at (810) 664-0811, Ext. 8122, or susan.younger@lapeergroup.com


Thank you!!!
Sandra
CEO & Founder
Dreamcatchers for Abused Children
www.myspace.com/abused_children
www.dreamcatchersforabusedchildren.com

http://www.dreamcatchersforabusedchildren.com/
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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Facts:

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:18 pm

FACTS:
**The safest family for a child is a home in which the biological parents are married.
**Cohabitation, an increasing phenomenon, is a major factor in child abuse.
**The incidence of child abuse decreases significantly as family income increases.
**Child abuse frequently is intergenerational.
**Child abuse is prevalent in "communities of abuse" with family breakdown.
**Child abuse is directly associated with serious violent crime.
**The lowest risk ratio for physical abuse is one in which the biological parents are married and the family has always been intact.
**Abuse is 6x's higher in the second-safest environment: the blended family in which the divorced mother has remarried.
**Abuse is 14x's higher if the child is living with a biological mother who lives alone.
**Abuse is 20x's higher if the child is living with a biological father who lives alone.
**Abuse is 20x's higher if the child is with biological parents who are not married but are cohabiting.
**Abuse is 33x's higher if the child is living with a mother who is living with a man.
** 1,500 children die from abuse each year.
**There are 140,000 injuries to children from abuse each year.
**There are 1.7 million reports of child abuse each year.
** 1 in 4 women in North America were molested in childhood.
**2 million+ cases of child abuse and neglect are reported each year in the U.S.
**An estimated 150,000 to 200,000 new cases of sexual abuse occur each year.
**There were an estimated 903,000 victims of maltreatment nationwide.
**An estimated 1,100 children died of abuse and neglect, a rate of approximately 1.6
**1 in 7 males will have been sexually molested before the age of 18.
**10 deaths per 100,000 children per year in the general populations.
**Each day in the U.S. more than 3 children die as a result of child abuse in the home.
**Child abuse is reported on average every 10 seconds.
**Approximately 3 MILLION child abuse reports are made each year.
**oNLY two-thirds of the reported cases were investigated.
**An estimated 903,000 victims were substantiated by child protective services agencies in 1998.
**Convicted rape and sexual assault offenders report that 2/3 of their victims were under the age of 18.
**Among rape victims less than 12 years of age, 90% of the children knew the offender, according to police-recorded incident data.
**Frequently, the person who sexually molests a child is also a child themselves...

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Amber Alert

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:20 pm


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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Pregnant Teen Help

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:21 pm

Pregnant Teen Help is presented for adults and teens. We offer information on teen pregnancy statistics, pregnancy facts, and teen pregnancy prevention. Our articles and research papers were compiled to educate the public about teenage pregnancy, the warning signs, and options available. We have obtained information from various surveys and sources including the National Institutes of Health, SAMHSA, the White House, FDA and more.

The United States has the highest rates of teen pregnancy and births in the western industrialized world. Teen pregnancy costs the United States at least $7 billion annually.


The fact that just under 1/3 of all girls in the United States will get pregnant in their teenage years is a sobering thought. Obviously, teen pregnancy is a problem in the United States. And the following statistics back that up:

Every year around 750,000 teenagers will get pregnant.
Depending on the state, teenage birth rates are incredibly different. Nevada has the highest rate: 113 per 1000 and North Dakota the lowest 42 per 1000.
Unmarried teenagers having children account for 24 percent of all unmarried expectant mothers.
More than 2/3 of all teenagers who have a baby will not graduate from high school.
Billions of dollars are spent taking care of teenage mothers and their children and they are more likely to be in the poverty bracket. On the flip side, millions of dollars are spent in prevention programs.
The good news is that teen births have dropped by almost a third since the beginning of the 1990s. With pregnancy prevention programs and more understanding and teaching about safe sex, this number will hopefully drop even more. Here are a few other statistics that hopefully point to even better prevention rates in the years to come:

In 2002 the abortion rate among teenager mother was 50 percent lower than its high point in 1988.
Among black teenagers, the pregnancy rate dropped around 40 percent since 1990.
Among Hispanic teenagers the pregnancy rate dropped around 19 percent since 1990.
Among white teenagers, the pregnancy rate dropped around 34 percent since 1990.
So while teenager pregnancies are dropping, it is still a constant problem as there are more and more kids who enter their teenager years each year. Teenager pregnancy programs are important to as the above statistics are showing that these programs yield good results. These programs should be continually studied to make sure they are up-to-date and working in the education of teenagers on the problems of teenager pregnancy.

One way of making sure to keep the programs fresh is to talk with the teenagers themselves, asking what they think about sex and how it is portrayed in their school life, by their friends, in their families, and in the media. How much do each of these contribute to how a teenager views sex? Parents and educators are in a position to somewhat monitor how sex and especially unsafe sex is being digested by the teenagers today. As more questions are answered and prevention programs initiated and/or updated, hopefully these statistics can continually to fall.

As mentioned above, billions of dollars are spent taking care of teenage mothers and their children while only millions are needed to provide good prevention program. For more information on teenage pregnancy prevention, see the Preventing Teenage Pregnancy article on this site.



Teen Pregnancy Prevention
As a teen, finding out that you are pregnant is a life-changing and scary event. As a parent, finding out your teen is pregnant can both shock you and cause despair as you wonder, now what? Before this ever happens, you can help your teen learn important lessons on how to prevent teen pregnancy.

As a teen, finding out that you are pregnant is a life-changing and scary event. As a parent, finding out your teen is pregnant can both shock you and cause despair as you wonder, now what? Before this ever happens, you can help your teen learn important lessons on how to prevent teen pregnancy.


Unfortunately, teen pregnancy is a nationwide problem. However, there are programs set up through the government and other organizations aimed at prevention. For example the

National Campaign to Prevent Teen Pregnancy: founded in 1996 with the goal to reduce teen pregnancy by one-third.
Adolescent Family Life Demonstration and Research program: began in 1981 provides research grants and demonstrations to promote programs that help raise the awareness of abstinence. This is an arm of the Department of Health and Human Services.
For more resources on prevention programs in your area, go online or contact your local health department. Check also with the schools in your area to understand what kind of teen pregnancy prevention programs they offer.

Although the rate for teen pregnancies have dipped since the early 1990s, the United States still has the dubious distinction of having the highest rate of teen pregnancy among other countries of similar status. So if you are parent of a teenager, what else can you do to help prevent your teenager from getting pregnant or getting someone pregnant?

Keep communication between you and your teen open so that talking about sex is easier to broach.
Be approachable so that if your teenager has questions about sex or relationships, you can be ready with answers.
Teach your family values and help your teen see how much they are worth. Explain that no one should be able to make him or her feel like they have to be sexually active.
Encourage safe and fun activities and sports. Show them their strengths and keep education a top priority.
Watch for warning signs of heavy relationships with the opposite sex. Also watch for signs of depression or a drop off in previously enjoyed activities. You may need to take further steps to help them avoid becoming sexually promiscuous.
Teach your teenager the problems associated with unsafe sex. Show him or her the diseases that can result as well as the threat of unplanned pregnancy.
Know what your teenager is doing and where they like to hang out. Make your home an open place for your teenager’s friends and encourage fun activities at responsible and respected places.
Finally abstinence is the only sure way of preventing teen pregnancy. Family values that promote abstinence as well as talking with your teenager over and over about the importance of abstinence can go a long way in preventing teen pregnancy.




Abortion Statistics
Abortion has been a touchy and personal subject for many years. Whether you are considering an abortion or just want to know more about the numbers of abortions, this article will provide statistical information to hopefully help you in your situation.
Abortion has been a touchy and personal subject for many years. Whether you are considering an abortion or just want to know more about the numbers of abortions, this article will provide statistical information to hopefully help you in your situation.


First of all there are about 1.38 billion women in the world who are in the childbearing years (ages 15-44). About 6 million women a year become pregnant. Many teenagers are also sexually active throughout the world. By age 20,

77 percent of women in developed countries have had sex,
83 percent of women in Sub-Sahara Africa have had sex, and
56 percent of women in Latin American and the Carribean have had sex.
And a lot of unplanned pregnancies result. More than 25 percent of women in the world get an abortion. Compare this with the United States where nearly 40 percent of women who get pregnant have an abortion. Here are some more statistics concerning the United States:

About half of all pregnancies are unplanned
1.29 million abortions took place in 2002
More than 42 million abortions were carried out from 1973 to 2002
2 out of every 100 women have an abortion each year. Many of these women have had abortions before
In looking at teens and young adults, more than 52 percent of abortions obtained are by women who are under 25
Around 66 percent of all abortions are obtained be single women
Teenagers obtain 19 percent of abortions
As of 2000, there were around 1800 places in the United States where a women could get an abortion
Most abortions (88 percent) occur in the first 8 weeks of pregnancy
Teenagers are more apt to get a late abortion
.3 percent of all abortions cause hospitalization for the woman
So what are the main reasons for abortion? Many women and teens worry about their future plans. Some women and teens do not feel they can afford a child. And still others do not want to go at parenthood alone.

Check out the Guttmacher Institute to look at your own state’s trends on abortion and to find out more information and statistics. Abortion is very serious and causes ethical and medical debates across the country. Some doctors performing abortions have even been killed. Nonetheless, many states have abortion counseling laws that are designed to work with your physician to help you understand the medical options available. Finding out what information is available and laws applicable in your area is an important step in making this decision.





Teen Suicide
Finding out your pregnant as a teenager can feel disastrous. Suddenly you may think your future plans are gone. You may even have thoughts of suicide. Here are some ideas of what you should do if you find yourself pregnant and suicidal.
Finding out your pregnant as a teenager can feel disastrous. Suddenly you may think your future plans are gone. You may even have thoughts of suicide. Here are some ideas of what you should do if you find yourself pregnant and suicidal.


First of all, any depression, whether or not it is associated with your pregnancy, should be addressed. However, with pregnancy, your mood swings can go crazy as your hormones change in preparation for having a baby. In fact, almost 20 percent of women will experience some from of depression while pregnant with 10 percent of these women experiencing major depression. Any depression, but especially major depression can lead to suicidal tendencies. If you were prone to depression before getting pregnant, you are more likely to experience depression while pregnant.

But as mentioned above, sometimes your hormones will bring on the emotional distress or even depression. If your mood swings cause you to get depressed or feel down enough to think about suicide, you need to do something soon. Getting help is so important! You not only have to think about yourself now, but the baby inside of you. Here are a few places to get help:

Your family
Your doctor
Your local hospital
A counselor (school counselors can help you find the right kind of counselor)
Friends
A religious advisor
Your community health center
Treating depression in pregnancy can be hard as the medications available may hurt the baby. There has not been a lot of research done in this area as even those promoting research are not sure if the baby would be harmed during the research. However, check with your local hospital or community health center for information concerning women who have been depressed and pregnant and see if they have any resources or can point you in the right direction. This information can point you in the direction of getting the medical and emotional help you need.

Interestingly enough, some professionals have found a connection between pregnancy and low suicide rates. For example between 1990 and 1993, 315 New York women committed suicide. Only 6 of these women were pregnant. Some professionals believe a increase of chemical in the brain that is linked to pregnancy, serotonin, helps women who are pregnancy not act on their suicidal tendencies, even if they are experiencing depression.

A final thought: there is also a connection between suicide and postpartum depression. So again, if you are feeling down and thinking about suicide after you have the baby, get help from any of the above outlets as soon as possible. Keeping yourself emotionally and physically healthy can help you get on with your future plans.

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty NCHS Data on Teenage Pregnancy

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:22 pm

NCHS Data on Teenage Pregnancy

About NCHS
The CDC's National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) is the nation's principal health statistics agency, providing data to identify and address health issues. NCHS compiles statistical information to help guide public health and health policy decisions.



Collaborating with other public and private health partners, NCHS employs a variety of data collection mechanisms to obtain accurate information from multiple sources. This process provides a broad perspective to help us understand the population's health, influences on health, and health outcomes.



Overview
Teenage pregnancy rates dropped 38 percent overall from 1990-2004. The rate fell from its historic peak in 1990, 116.8 per 1,000 aged 15-19 years, to 72.2 in 2004. The 2004 pregnancy rate for teenagers was the lowest ever reported since the national series of estimates began in 1976.



Trends in Teen Pregnancy by Age
The declines in teenage pregnancy have been much steeper for younger than for older teenagers. The rate for teenagers 15-17 years dropped steeply, by 46 percent from 77.1 per 1,000 in 1990 to 41.5 in 2004. The rate for older teenagers fell as well, by 29 percent beginning in 1991, from 167.7 to 118.6. The 2004 rates for each of these age groups were also lower than for any year during the 1976 -2004 period.

Rates by Race and Hispanic Origin
Pregnancy rates dropped for teenagers in all population subgroups between 1990 and 2004. Overall, pregnancy rates for black and white non-Hispanic teenagers declined 45 and 48 percent, respectively, with much larger declines for younger than for older teenagers. The rates for Hispanic teenagers began to decline after 1992; the overall teen pregnancy rate for this group fell about 24 percent during 1992-2004.



Changes in Pregnancy Rates by Outcome
All components of the pregnancy rates for teenagers (births, abortions, and fetal losses) declined from 1990 through 2004. Teenage birth rates fell one-third from the 1991 peak (61.8 per 1,000) through 2004, and continued to decline through 2005 (by 35 percent to 40.5). The birth rate increased 3 percent between 2005 and 2006 (41.9), interrupting the long-term decline. Abortion rates for teenagers dropped by one-half from 40.3 to 19.8 per 1,000.



Birth and abortion rates fell for non-Hispanic white and black teenagers and for Hispanic teenagers through 2004. The declines in birth and abortion rates during 1990-2004 were 37 and 65 percent, respectively, for white teenagers; 46 percent and 43 percent for black teenagers; and 18 percent and 31 percent for Hispanic teenagers. After generally continuing to decline through 2005, birth rates for each population subgroup increased in 2006.



Factors Accounting for the Recent Decline in Teen Pregnancy
NCHS' 2002 National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) shows trends in behaviors underlying the reductions in U.S. teenage pregnancy rates through the early 2000s. During 1995 to 2002, the percent of female teens who had ever had intercourse declined significantly (among ages 15-17) or was stable (among ages 18-19). During the same time period, the percent who used contraception at last sex rose from 71 to 83 percent. According to recent data on high school students from CDC's Youth Risk Behavior Survey (2007), increases in contraceptive use and decreases in sexual activity stopped after 2001. These may be among the factors accounting for the upturn in teenage birth rates in 2006. Findings from Cycle 7 of the NSFG (available in late 2009) are expected to help explain the most recent trends and variations in pregnancy rates and the behavioral, social, and economic factors that account for them.



Teenage Pregnancy Data Sources
NCHS and its partners employ a variety of data collection mechanisms to obtain accurate information from multiple sources. They include:

•National Vital Statistics System - Collects information from birth certificates in all 50 states and the District of Columbia, including detailed age and race/ethnicity characteristics. Because all births are part of this database, it provides the detail needed for monitoring annual change in teenage pregnancy and for research on disparities. (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/births.htm)
•National Survey of Family Growth (NSFG) - The Nation's leading source of reliable national data on topics related to birth and pregnancy histories, sexual activity, contraception and fertility, HIV risk behaviors, and marriage, divorce, and cohabitation. The NSFG is conducted through confidential personal interviews. Pregnancy history data from the NSFG are the source of information on fetal loss that is incorporated in the teen pregnancy rates. The NSFG also provides critical information on behavioral and social patterns that may affect teen sexual behavior. (http://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nsfg.htm)
•CDC's Abortion Surveillance System - CDC's National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP) collects summary data on abortions from most State health departments. Information is collected on several patient characteristics, including age, race, Hispanic origin, and marital status. (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/PDF/ss/ss5609.pdf )
•The Guttmacher Institute - The Guttmacher Institute compiles national totals of abortions from their surveys of all known abortion providers. The Guttmacher Institute's national totals are distributed by patient characteristics (i.e., age, race, Hispanic origin, marital status) according to CDC/NCCDPHP's tabulations. (http://www.guttmacher.org/sections/abortion.php )
•CDC's Youth Risk Behavior Surveillance System (YRBSS) - CDC's NCCDPHP monitors priority health-risk behaviors among youth and young adults through its YRBSS. The YRBSS includes a national school-based survey conducted by state, territorial, and local education and health agencies and tribal governments. (http://www.cdc.gov/HealthyYouth/yrbs/index.htm)
Challenges and Future Opportunities in Monitoring Teen Pregnancy
•Measuring and tracking teenage pregnancy is challenging because of the need to aggregate data from three independent data sources: birth data, summary data on induced abortion, and fetal losses.
•Now that the NSFG is being conducted continuously (since mid 2006), we will be able to update the estimates of fetal loss on a more regular and frequent basis. Continuous interviewing will also make it possible to track changes in behavioral and social patterns that may affect teen sexual behavior on a more timely basis. Data from the first 30 months of continuous data collection in cycle 7 are expected to be available in late 2009.

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty National Foster Care & Adoption Directory

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:24 pm

National Foster Care & Adoption Directory Search

http://www.childwelfare.gov/nfcad/

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Nationwide State Resources and Links

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:25 pm

Nationwide State Resources and Links


Separated by state, lists of major government links such as State Page, Governor and Attorney Generals office, State Constitution, Codes, Laws, Rules, Regulations, tons of stuff. Even a link to missing children in each state from the Center for Missing and Exploited Children. There appears to be some bugs with their advertising on some of the state pages, but the info is still all there.

http://www.patriotstoolbox.org/medialinks/index.htm

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Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:26 pm


http://helpfindthemissing.org

Our primary objective is to assist the families of missing persons. Our focus is to get people involved and perhaps ultimately generate new leads and public interest. You may, unknowingly, have some crucial information to a currently unsolved crime or missing persons case.

We have an ever-growing database of missing adults and children. You can view all or by state, children or adults. We also have areas for International Missing, Who AM I and Missing from Cruise Ships.

Also offered are support systems to help deal with grief when you have a lost/murdered loved ones on our interactive forums.

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty Missing Children Society of Canada

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:27 pm


http://www.mcsc.ca/Index.aspx

Missing Children Society of Canada may be contacted by phone or fax, email, post, or by using the form at the bottom of this page.
CALGARY HEAD OFFICE
Suite 219, 3501 – 23 Street NE
Calgary, Alberta T2E 6V8
Telephone: (403) 291-0705
Fax: (403) 291-9728
Email: info @ mcsc.ca (omit spaces)
TOLL FREE 24 HOURS 1-800-661-6160 ONTARIO
99 Bronte Road, Suite 814
Oakville, Ontario L6L 3B7
Telephone: (905) 469-8826
Fax: (905) 469-8828
Email: missingchildren @ mcsc.ca (omit spaces)

Missing Children Society of Canada was federally incorporated in 1986.

Charitable Registration No. 10770 6392 RR0001.

Staff can be contacted by email. The first initial and the last name (with no spaces or special characters) and ‘@ mcsc.ca’ comprise each staff member’s email address.

Example: John Smith’s email address would be jsmith @ mcsc.ca (omit spaces).
STAFF
Rhonda Morgan
Founder & Executive Director Wendy Christensen
Investigator Kelly McIsaac
Office Administrator
Barb Snider
International Case Manager Gregg McMartin
Investigator Brenda Mantle
Donor Relations Coordinator
Marilyne Aalhus
Director of Development


If your child is missing, immediately inform your local police authority.

For further assistance, call the Missing Children Society of Canada toll free at 1.800.661.6160.

Other Important Resources

* Our Missing Children
* Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada
* National Center for Missing and Exploited Children


If you have any information about a missing child, call Missing Children Society of Canada toll free at 1.800.661.6160 or email us at tips @ mcsc.ca

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Hotlines and Helplines Empty National Voice for Children

Post by avalonpointe Sun Jul 05, 2009 8:28 pm

National Voice for Children

http://nvfc.us/component/option,com_frontpage/Itemid,1/

All children on our site must be registered first with NCMEC and be an open case. The National Voice For Children works together in harmony will all agencies to help with issues concerning child safety and welfare. We are an awareness mechanism that can provide tools that will help you. Look through our resources page to find the proper agency that is best suited for your individual needs.

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